Posts in Category: Training in Rio

The non stop evolution of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu  

This is what I call WHITE BELT motivation

We have all heard about the evolution of BJJ, when you compare the techniques of the past to today, it's shocking to see how much it has grown from 20 years to now, but that is kind of normal on most sports, right? What is even more shocking for me is how some techniques are develop and get popular every 6 months or a year and how passionated are the comments about than. Most popular and recent examples are, of course, how people were obsessed with 5050 and had a love/hate relationship with it: "Should be banned from tournaments" were the comment that I disagreed the most...

Right after was the Berimbolo wave, that is still popular, but a bit less...looked out of this world (and still does), it was the evolution of the helicopter (technique from 90's), but soon enough everyone got an understanding of it and to counter many start the "double pull guard" and again the passionate comments "BAN FROM THE SPORT!!! There is no use on self defense" etc

Lapel Guard

More recently the Lapel or Worm guard is taking the roll of the bad guy and people are against it again. To say it's ONLY good to stall is a very single mind view of it. Just take a closer look to see how many option can open.

I'm just very glad those negative opinions were not heard, imagine if for everything new and difficult to count we would make not allowed? (wasn't that what JUDO did and still does sometimes?) Would our Martial Art/ Sport evolve? ( Yes, I did use "/sport " and I love that BJJ has ALSO become a sport)

I Usually note that the one's who don't know the technique, don't understand, feel they are too old to learn a new trick or even worse, think they know everything that is important are the one's vouching against it. From white to black belt...

I have promise myself to at least try never to fall into one of the categories I just mentioned, but I have to say it's tiring and some times discouraging, often I catch myself think "Fu#%, here it comes another concept to be learn". But you know what? It's when I feel like a white belt again that I'm motivate...if I felt I had nothing else to learn, to improve why would I keep going?

I told almost no one about a recent injury I had, that kept me from putting a GI during 6 months, that was the longest I had to stay without a gi since 1994 (just because I was exchange student in a city that had no BJJ). Because of that I couldn't follow so much of the so call Lapel guard or Worm guard. I knew the idea from looking videos, but  couldn't say I had a good understanding of it (Not sure I can say that now, but anyways).

Yesterday I had the chance to roll with a 16 years old, female blue belt that is doing the Worm guard like a pro, with many variations and giving trouble to everyone she has been training with. The fact that she is 54kg confirmed my theory that she was all about technique and minimum strength. I learned so much from her during the roll and also after, while she was kind enough to explain and teach what she was trying and looking for with each different grip. If I had the chance to look from outside, I would risk saying that was beautiful to see the Black Belt (me), learning as if he was a white belt from the young blue belt (her). I wish someone had film that. I was lucky enough to have my friend from BJJ HACKS (Subscribe to his channel, if you haven't yet, some sick BJJ stuff) there to film at least part of our training and here he shares with everyone. You can see in my face how I'm watching every movement she does, every grip change and trying to absorb as much as possible. I love this exchange BJJ allows you to have, despite of the color of the belt. So here is my advice to close this few lines:

Learn from everyone! Everyone knows something you don't, be open to that information! Once your knowledge grown, it will never go back to the previous size. 

HERE is the video:

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5 important 50/50 techniques to improve your game 

everything you need to know about...

 

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE ENTIRE COURSE , if you are new, REGISTER FREE (Click HERE) and use the code BBBFREETRIAL to watch this techniques and many more!

5050 is a controvertial technique, some love, some hate. As a BJJ competitor and coach, I prefer to leave those emotions out of it and make sure I understand the new techniques, just by having a good understanding of it I can choose whether it applies to my game or not and if I face someone who loves doing it, I know what to expect and how to defend.

By having a good understanding of 5050, when I face someone who is clueless about it (maybe because that person choose to adopt the "I hate, I dont need"posture), it usually means I will play with that person and make 5050 look more like 100% in my favor. If it happens that I face a opponent that is also familiar with it, that normally means the strategie will take place and experience and little details may make the difference towards the winner.

 

It's a mistake to think 5050 is made for stall, it's not. What happen is that when 2 fighters have similar knowledge about it, it becomes very hard to progress, cause the position allow both sides to use the same principles. 

 

Well, this is the least I demand my students to know, hope you can benefit from it:

Click on the picture to see the video:

felipe costa

Technique 1 (VIDEO HERE):

First is important to understand what you should look for once you fall on the 5050, by undertanding this, your chances of progressing will increase, so check out this first details on how to behave if you find yourself there:

 

1 & 2) 

Make sure your left hand control your opponent's knee, that way is not easy for him to step out of this "trap", also start to face the outside, towards the opposite leg that is trap (to your right on this picture)

 

Squeese your legs together for extra control, face completely to your right, in a way that he have no option to reset. Keeping your foot on his ribs may help preventing him from coming  up.

 

3, 4, 5 & 6) 

If you did everything correct up to this point, it will be difficult for him to come on top, but if he does, just completely stretch your left leg, parallel to the ground pushing him back, that way your weight will act on his hip will make impossible for him to establish top position.

 

7, 8 & 9)

Use that motion of putting your opponent butt back on the ground to bring your self back up, make sure to use the movement just like a technique stand up drill. It's important to open your right knee in a angle to get a better base and avoind your opponent turn to his right and take your balance away, just as you did with him.

 

felipe costa erick raposo

 

Technique 2 VIDEO HERE:

Some times, your opponent is familiar with the basics too and become harder to stand up first, here is what to do if you are the one a step behind

 

1,2&3) 

You were too late, your opponent managed to stand up, possibly because you fail to face the correct way and make your leg heavy on his hips, but you still have a chance.

 

4&5)

Reach for his leg that is not trap and make a grip close to his know with the palm of your hand facing up. That grip is important to make it easier to push later on, when he is falling

Use this same grip to help your head to approach that leg, making a movement as if you were going to pass under his legs

 

5&7)

Keep that motion, going with your head as if you will pass under his leg towards his back, when you feel he will start to loose balance, streach your right leg foward, following the line of your own body, that will be enough to make you fall

 

8,9,10&11)

Once he falls, do not follow his motion and come on top, if you do this he will trap you and maybe do the same back to you (I would only go up if I need to score and it's the last few seconds of the fight).

As you let him fall without going up, you will create space for your leg to retreat, take advantage of that moment and hide your foot and show on picture 9. Once you have done this, you will be able to come on top in a position similar to a leg drag and by putting pressure, big chances you will end up on his side control. 

 

felipe costa erick raposo bjj

 

Technique 3 VIDEO HERE

 

Once you are comfortable with the first 2 techniques, you may get enough confidence to let your opponent move a bit more, once you do it, this is another option that turn to be a great short cut to get the back. 
 
1&2)
Once you feel your opponent is try to stand up, let he do it and start to enter your left hook on his other leg, the one that is not trapped as if you are going towards the X guard.
 
3,4&5) 
Once he stands up, swing your upper body to your left and that same hook will give you the extra  leverage you need to move your head towards his back .
If you can, reach out for his pants, that grip will secure that he can't face you again, once he realize where he is getting him self at.
 
6&7)
Right grip on his knee will hold his leg still, so you can stretch your leg in a way it can be brought under his hips towards your leg.
 
8)
Keep your left grip, but let go your right grip towards his belt
9)
Make sure to keep your legs bend close to your body, using it was a chair/shield, since once your opponent falls back, that will protect you
10&11) Once he falls on your lap, keep your hooks active to control him while you make the transition of your arms to the "sit belt"control and later the hook in the traditional way.
 
felipe costa jiu jitsu
 
 
This is a trick technique, the kind of technique you get everyone once and they ask what you did, of course you teach and never get them again, cause they don't do the same mistake. But it's still fun to know
 
1&2) if you notice your opponent is closing the leg with the triangle, hold his shin in a way he can no longer unlock
3&4)
bring you right leg and trap their foot as show
5, 6&7)
Now use your hand to pull their knee towards you at the same time you force your right leg. This will apply pressure on their calf. Remember that calf slicer are only allow for brown and black belts. 
 
If they dont take, they may at least make space for you to take your leg out, as showed on the second technique
 
5050 felipe costa

 

On techique 5, Im showing a common mistake people do and my training partner Erick Raposo will take advantage of it to apply a footlock

 

1)

My first mistake is to lock the triangle when in the 5050, that leads my opponent open to attach my foot

2)

Even worse would be to attack the foot of his leg that is trap, because since my back is on the ground, the motion to apply pressure is limited, also the fact that his leg is stretch, makes even harder. Of course is not impossible to get it, but the movement is limited, so it's harder.

3) notice that while I'm trying to attack his foot, my left foot is open near his hands

4&5) All he needs to do is lock it in and because I had the triangle close and his pressure in toward the angle that hurts the most, even if we are both attacking each other's foot, he will tap me out first.

 

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE ENTIRE COURSE , if you are new, REGISTER FREE ( Click HERE)  and use the code BBBFREETRIAL to watch this techniques and many more

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Posted by Felipe Costa Sep 01, 2014 Categories: Academia BJJ Felipe Costa Jiu Jitsu Personal Training Program Training in Rio Video BJJ

Winning Mindset for Competition 

Jiu-Jitsu for Small Guys

 

What happens if you're just no good at the thing you love? Felipe Costa loved jiu-jitsu, but his terrible results in competition would leave him demoralised and depressed. Instead of walking away he refused to quit, went back to the drawing board and became a world champion. 

In this video, Felipe -- a member of the Brasa team and a roosterweight competitor (58kg) -- talks about the obstacles he had to overcome and the methods he used to rise to the top. He describes the sports psychology tricks he applied to win tournaments, and explains how he approaches his training as a smaller jiu-jitsu player. We also see some rolling footage from his 'light guys only' training sessions, get-togethers reserved for jiu-jitsu players under 73kg. 

Film by Hywel Teague for BJJ Hacks 
http://www.bjjhacks.com

Highlights of the interview include: 
00.02: "There is not one fight where it doesn't cross my mind that I already lost" 
01.08: "Before my black belt I never won a gold medal in any major tournament" 
01.48: "I started at 12, until I was 16 I never won a fight" 
02.12: "It was a love-hate relationship with competition" 
02.49: "My second year as a black belt I entered the world championship and won" 
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06.06: "The person who is small and doesn't give up... is going to become maybe the most technical player in the academy" 
07.08: " I don't see many people my size on the street, so if somebody picks a fight with me I have to be ready against a bigger guy" 
07.26: "If I'm not preparing to fight bigger guys... why should I train on a daily basis with bigger guys?" 
07.40: "The safest thing is to fight people my size" 
08.23: "I would fight with a guy with long legs, heavy. Then I would get in a tournament with a guy with short legs, faster and moves much better" 
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11.08: "For me it was about putting small goals to improve little by little" 
11.18: "I was pretty technical in the academy. In the tournament, I sucked" 
11.41: "Nowadays I would look to a professional for help" 
11.59: "I would concentrate and think as if I was in the academy" 
12.30: "If I was starting now and had the chance to look for a professional... I would not hesitate" 
12.45: "These struggles... it's something that happens even today" 
13.00: "I'm more technical today than I was yesterday... so how can my performance be worse?" 
13.24: "Your mind is trying to make you do whatever is easier" 
13.47: "You have to say 'I'm not giving up now'" 
14.23: "When you don't put so much pressure on yourself, the results will come"