Posts in Category: Felipe Costa

10 most important things every white belt should know 

Actually not only white but every BJJ practitioner

 

1) TRUST AND BE TRUSTWORTHY!

NEVER hold a sub past the tap out. When in Doubt as to whether your training partner has tapped, let go - better save than sorry. By striving to be a more reliable training partner and trust your teammates and coaches, the environment becomes a safer and more pleasant place in which to learn. If you are not having fun, none of it makes sense. Jiu-Jitsu is something you carry with you for the rest of your life. Each stage should be great; after all, the art is the most wonderful addiction you could possibly have.

2) BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU IS DONE IN A GI.

As trendy as it is, make sure to have a good understanding of the techniques using cloth before venturing into No-Gi Jiu-Jitsu. It is easier to adapt your Gi techniques to No-Gi than vice-versa.

3) YOU CAN TRAIN WITH A BLACK BELT BUT MAKE SURE YOU'RE INVITED

This tip is kind of old fashioned and is often resented by recently promoted students. It happens that the higher-ranked feel like they are being "challenged"a lower belt summons them to train. You have to realize that they know who is available just by the way the person looks at them. Look at them humbly and make clear you are available - if they want to, they will invite you. And take my word, it's always more rewarding to roll when you've been invited than when you do the inviting.

4) STUDENTS ARE OFTEN DISCOURAGED WHEN THEIR START IN JIU-JITSU IS LESS THAN IDEAL, 

so it would behoove the beginner to do some research before committing to a class, making sure the instructor they pick enjoys what he does and is kindly to all the students, not just his best ones. If after starting classes you get the feeling the instructors aren't paying you enough attention, don't accept that as being normal - It isn't. A much better alternative to quitting is to switch to a gym where you feel welcome.

5)BELIEVE IN THE TECHNIQUES.

As frustrating as it may be at first, try your best to defend by using the techniques already in your repertory. If you feel like you've run out of options, have a word with your instructor; he'll be glad to get input on your needs.

6) ONE OF THE COOLEST THINGS ABOUT BJJ IS THE EXCHANGE OF IDEAS ON HOW TO PERFORM A TECHNIQUE.

Feel free to ask the more experienced students questions. Ask what you could have done to defend an attack or pull off that submission you were so close to getting. They've surely been through those situations before and can clue you in on all the ins and outs. Higher ranked students tend to enjoy being appreciated and get a kick out of being able to help.

7) DO YOUR HOME WORK!


It's frustrating to a teacher when they do their best to teach a new move or concept and short while later a student has already forgotten it. Doing lots of repetitions is essencial, even if you feel a particular technique doesn't fit your style yet, so what seems useless to you today may turn out to be your greatest asset tomorrow. Besides doing repetitions, take a few minutes each day to go over the techniques in your head.

8) TAP OUT

Nobody wants to see a student intentionally tap out, but good students aren't afraid to take chances or put themselves in positions of disadvantage. If you do tap, so be it; let it serve as a lesson. During moments of real danger, your chances of prevailing are all the greater when you're accostumed to such harrowing situations.

9) TRY NEW THINGS!

There's no point in sparring like you're fighting in a final the whole time. Sure, there are times when you should go hard, but let your coach be the judge of when that should be. Generally speaking, I recommend always trying new things, puting the move of the day to practice. The more diversified your game is, the better the tools you'll have at your disposal in the future.

10) SELF-DEFENSE IS OF THE ESSENCE.


There are plenty of teachers out there who are oblivious to the importance of teaching even basic self-defense techniques - some for lack of familiarity, others because they feel they moves are outdated. Down the road, self-defense techniques will provide you an understanding of moves you so far haven't a clue about, not to mention they're fun. Keep in mind that each of the current techniques, even the tournament-level techniques, in some way or another originated from the basics. Knowing and understanding the basics is like a lesson in history and will keep you from making basic mistakes.

 Article wrote by Felipe Costa and published on GracieMag #179 in March 2012

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Posted by Felipe Costa Jul 20, 2013 Categories: Academia BJJ Felipe Costa Seminars Training in Rio

Felipe Costa: 'Peso Leve deve treinar com peso leve' 

entrevista para o site BJJPIX

http://www.bjjpix.com/index.php/pt/11-jiu-jitsu/258-felipe-costa-pt

Felipe Costa: 'Peso Leve deve treinar com peso leve'

 

William Burkhardt
Published by: William Burkhardt
Email:
 williambkh@gmail.com
BJJPix Photographer
no dia 

Felipe Costa, campeão mundial de 2003, fala sobre o seu treino para atletas peso leve e sua preparação para o Brasileiro e Mundial desse ano.

 

BJJPix - Você acha que treinar com oponentes muitos pesados atrapalha o desenvolvimento de seu jiu jitsu?

Felipe - Não, eu acho que é muito importante treinar com pessoas mais pesadas, mas tudo tem um limite. Qual a necessidade de uma pessoa de 60kgs treinar regularmente com pessoas de mais de 80kgs? Claro que de vez em quando, tudo bem, mas acredito, baseado em minha experiência, que os riscos de contusão são muito maiores que os benefícios que o treino pode trazer.
 

BJJPix - Você mudou algo na sua preparação para o Brasileiro e o Mundial?

Felipe - O foco é de manter a enfase no Treino dos leves que tem se tornado cada dia mais forte e sério. Muitos atletas, mesmo de outras equipes tem procurado a gente para participar e todos são bem acolhidos. A intenção é ajudar todos a melhorar e além disso as contusoes diminuiram muito, já que não nos arriscamos contra companehiros muito mais pesados. Seguimos a planilha do Itallo Vilardo e o conhecimento dele permite uma configuração de treino e intervalos que fazem muita diferença no resultado final, além de maior confiança.
 

BJJPix - Onde vai depois do mundial?

Felipe - Depois do Mundial, ficarei 4 semanas dando aula nos EUA, visitarei Califórnia, Nevada, Arizona, Tennessee, Ohio e Nova York. Estarei filmado minhas aulas e disponibilizando no meu site www.BrazilianBlackBelt.com . Quem quiser acompanhar pode se registrar gratuitamente e se usar o código: BBBFREETRIAL poderá ter acesso a tudo.
 

BJJPix - Pode me dizer um pouco mais sobre o seu site? Qual foi a sua intenção quando criou ele?

Felipe - Minha intenção ao criar o site foi de ter uma aproximação ainda maior com meus associados e seus alunos. Muitas vezes só posso visitá-los uma ou duas vezes por ano, então o site seria uma forma deles terem maior acesso as minhas aulas. Depois de pronto, vimos que isso podia ser uma coisa muito maior, algo que pessoas de todo mundo poderiam se beneficiar e trocar informações buscando melhorar no Jiu Jitsu. Ainda estamos em fase de ajustes, vamos melhorar bastante, mas o resultado tem sido satisfatório e o número de registro tem sido maior que esperávamos.
 

BJJPix - O Erick  Raposo está competindo muito aqui no Rio, ele tem potencial?

Felipe - O Erick tem um talento enorme e é muito dedicado. O potencial dele tem sido freado por que já teve o visto para os EUA negado 4 vezes, isso atrapalha muito ele a tentar competir em torneios internacionais. Mas os resultados dele no Brasil é muito bom e vejo ele como um dos tops da categoria.

Jul 02, 2013 Categories: BJJ Felipe Costa